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Modeling and European Beech

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  • Modeling and European Beech

    Hi everyone,

    I have some experience modeling trees, but I want to improve with more practice and for that I am modeling an European Beech.

    Something weird is happening when I add the Big Branches node to the main trunk. As you can see in the attached image, I get a white line when welding this geometry and get the following error message

    Failed weld (branch too high on parent)

    Not sure what do as the branches aren't that high, they start around .22 and finish at .98.

    Any help is appreciated
    Last edited by Cyrus3v; 05-16-2019, 10:59 AM.

  • #2
    Hello,
    The weld failing also depends on the spread amounts and size of the branch itself. If you have a high spread but you're still relatively close to the top of the branch, there is no space for the blend geometry to attach. If your trunk is getting smaller towards the top, the radius of the branch might need to be lowered as well.

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    • #3
      Thanks Sarah for the reply.

      Attached is a screenshot of the tree. I tried making the branches smaller and radius lower, but without success. Could be the case that I am using a legacy node for the trunk? I think this tree was initially done in Cinema 7.

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      • #4
        Did a quick test with a new trunk and the problem is solved. I guess I will have to copy all the settings from the old trunk to these new ones.

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        • #5
          Hello! that is exactly it, the parent system needs to be on an upgraded spine generator. You can right click your generator and hit "upgrade" and your settings will be converted for you!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by SarahScruggs View Post
            Hello! that is exactly it, the parent system needs to be on an upgraded spine generator. You can right click your generator and hit "upgrade" and your settings will be converted for you!
            Thanks.

            I have another question:

            Is there a way I can procedural avoid this intersection?

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            • #7
              Is it possible to get this level of detail in Speedtree? Or is it better to model something like this in 3D and import the geometry into Speedtree?

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              • #8
                Is 14 millions of polygons too much for a tree?
                Attached Files

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                • #9
                  Hello- Are you modeling for VFX? 14 million is certainly quite high. Here are some helpful hints:

                  1. We tend to keep our store trees on high resolution under 5 million maximum.
                  2. If you want that level of detail in the branches, I'd suggest spending less polygons in the lower trunks and taking some out of the leaf mesh themselves.
                  3. Turning off welding in the upper canopy will help tremendously and using the parent curves to strategically lose polygons down the tree.
                  4. Most often you are viewing the tree for a render a good distance back and the twig detail is not necessary.
                  5. If you're doing an up close render and would like the upper detail, knockout and pruning on your small branches could help a great deal as well as you very infrequently need such a dense tree.

                  Lastly on branch intersection: you can always make any set of branches into a "collection" the help with intersections. Here is the documentation on how to do that! http://docs8.speedtree.com/modeler/d...=collections&s[]=collection

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SarahScruggs View Post
                    Hello- Are you modeling for VFX? 14 million is certainly quite high. Here are some helpful hints:

                    1. We tend to keep our store trees on high resolution under 5 million maximum.
                    2. If you want that level of detail in the branches, I'd suggest spending less polygons in the lower trunks and taking some out of the leaf mesh themselves.
                    3. Turning off welding in the upper canopy will help tremendously and using the parent curves to strategically lose polygons down the tree.
                    4. Most often you are viewing the tree for a render a good distance back and the twig detail is not necessary.
                    5. If you're doing an up close render and would like the upper detail, knockout and pruning on your small branches could help a great deal as well as you very infrequently need such a dense tree.

                    Lastly on branch intersection: you can always make any set of branches into a "collection" the help with intersections. Here is the documentation on how to do that! http://docs8.speedtree.com/modeler/d...=collections&s[]=collection
                    Hi Sarah,

                    Thanks for your reply. Yes and I am modelling for Arch Viz and the idea is having some good trees for close ups and at the same time producing different LODs. I will try turning off the welding and reducing the amount of polygons in the leaves. Because we used it for Arch Viz we kind need some nice details in the twigs, but I guess I could do just a couple of branches and use then when necessary. Thanks for the "collection" tip, that will help a lot.

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                    • #11
                      When modeling a tree that will have different stages of growth, which is the best approach? Start with a sapling, save the file, create an adult tree and so on? I am asking that because I modeled that tree above and I tried to create a sapling by reducing the trunk size and radius. The result was horrendous. Any tips?

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                      • #12
                        Hi Cyrus, I personally like to create the adult tree first and work backward. As I adjust the length and radius, most often I'll hide the upper canopy of the tree and work from the base up again. Part of the advantage of modeling with % of parent numbers is that usually if I've set the first three generators or so to what I need lengthwise- the upper branches adjust from those amounts. If I don't like the way it looks or the tree is a wildly different shape when young, sometimes I'll scrap all of the generators and just use the advantage of having all the texture files already loaded in. I generally change my PBR settings on young trees for a greener less rough look.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks Sarah. I had to redo this tree so that the first 3 levels are based on % and not absolute values.

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                          • #14
                            Update to my London Plane
                            Attached Files

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                            • #15
                              Is there any command line to export the trees? It was a pain have to wait up to 1 hour while I could be modeling another 3.

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